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The Origins of Silicon Valley: Early EPS Pioneers

Date
2017-12-04
Time
11:00 AM EST
Location
Webinar - Online
Contact
Denise Manning – d.manning@ieee.org
Presenter
Paul Wesling
Description

Presenter: Paul Wesling

Host: Ken Pyle

Earn 1 Professional Development Hour (PDH) for completing the webinar - Complete Form

Abstract: 

Discover the exciting and colorful history of technology development and innovation that began in Palo Alto CA in 1910 and spread across the Santa Clara Valley.  You'll meet some of the colorful characters – Cyril Elwell, Lee De Forest, Bill Eitel, Charles Litton, Fred Terman, David Packard and others – who set leadership patterns for the electronics industries through their inventions and process development. You’ll find out about Charles “Bud” Eldon of HP, who founded a predecessor IRE Group in 1954 that become CPMT, now EPS, and served as president of the IEEE.  Find out why Silicon Valley has had such an effect on the world.  

Bio:

Paul Wesling got interested in technology as a youngster.  He went on to receive his BS in electrical engineering and his MS in materials science from Stanford University.  Following assignments at GTE/Lenkurt Electric, ISS/Sperry-Univac, Datapoint Peripheral Products (VP - Product Integrity), and Amdahl (mainframe testing), he joined Tandem Computers in Cupertino (now part of Hewlett Packard) in 1985.  He designed several multi-chip module prototypes, managed Tandem's Distinguished Lectures series, and organized a number of advanced technology courses for his Division and also for the IEEE.  He managed a grant from the National Science Foundation for the development of multimedia educational modules.  Paul retired from HP in 2001, and then served for 10 years as the Communications Director for the IEEE’s S.F. Bay Area Council.

 

As Vice President of Publications from 1985 through 2008, he supervised four archival journals and a newsletter for IEEE’s Electronics Packaging Society.  He is a Fellow of the IEEE, and received the IEEE Centennial Medal, the Board's Distinguished Service award, the Society Contribution Award, and the IEEE's Third Millennium Medal. He has organized over 500 courses for the local IEEE chapter in the Santa Clara Valley (Silicon Valley), many of them held at Stanford University (and, more recently, at Silicon Valley company facilities).

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